“How do I improve my writing?”

I’ve been writing consistently for over 2.5 years

Though, I admit, I’m not the greatest blogger—but that’s not why I write.

From these few years, I’ve learned how to differentiate bad writing from the good.

How?

By simply writing a lot. 

I’ve written nearly 1000 blog posts that I keep recorded. 

I’ve shared several thousands (3000+) content pieces for my businesses. 

All this has given me time and practice to improve my writing skills.

But first, what does bad writing entail? What makes bad writing bad and what makes good writing good?

Or the better question, who decides? 

Who gets to make the final decision on what’s good or bad?

The answer is simple.

I love to write with the follow question at the back of my mind: Who are you writing for? 

Take this question very seriously. 

Who you’re writing for represents the people who decide whether your piece is bad or good.

Everyone else’s opinions don’t matter (including mom’s unless she’s the audience).

So before you go into a deep spiral about how terrible of a writer you are, just remember that the value of your writing is in the eye of the reader.

So there you have it.

As long as you provide a message that is valuable for a specific reader, then you’ve got yourself a good piece of writing (at least it would be in my books).  

The biggest lesson I learned from 3 years of social media marketing

There’s no room for perfectionism in the world of social media marketing.

Absolutely none. 

Zero.

Get the idea of perfecting out of your head.

Here’s the truth.

You either make content or you don’t.

You either press the share button or you don’t.

You either engage with other people’s content or you don’t.

Most importantly, you either learn from the process of doing all the above, or you don’t.

That’s how I learned (and am still learning) the art of social media content marketing.

So when you see a piece of content from me, I’m experimenting and learning so that I can do better on the next one.  

How I deal with not knowing what content to write next

People who produce content will relate: 

Struggling with the thought of “What do I post next?” 

My job in social media marketing taught me 1 thing, which is the following. 

A glimpse into your past month of previous content will inform you what to make next. 

What performs well, what doesn’t—it all solves itself when you look at the performance of previous content. 

Use them as a blueprint for your next content strategy. 

What you think will perform well on social media vs. what actually performs well on social media vs. what lands a real sale

The first is always exciting because we hold up our expectations. We sell ourselves on a story of success and we try our best to make it happen, only to cross our fingers to see if the data unfolds in the way we want it to.

The second is based on actual data. What actually performs well on social media is a result of the market. More times than not, what we think will perform well doesn’t actually perform well on social media platforms. Only the data will tell (and the algorithms but that’s a topic for a different day).

Lastly, high output of content ≠ high sales. However, more content = more chances to increase awareness about your product or business. What lands a real sale as a result of social media marketing is the last step of the funnel for many creators. 

There’s no room for perfectionism in the world of social media marketing

You either make content or you don’t.

You either press the share button or you don’t.

You either engage with other people’s content or you don’t.

Most importantly, you either learn from the process of doing all the above, or you don’t.

That’s how I learned (and am still learning) the art of social media content marketing. 

So when you see a piece of content from me, I’m experimenting and learning so that I can do better on the next one. 

Write like you urgently need to get a point across

There are only so many hours in a day. 

Whether you’re leading a meeting, taking a phone call, or working on a design project, there’s a point to be addressed. 

Address your point by asking the 2 questions: 

  1. What is it?
  2. And who is it for? 

Get to the point as soon as you can, where appropriate. 

Your social media metrics aren’t making the cut. So what?

In social media jobs, numbers matter. 

The higher your metrics go, the more successful your campaign or post was. 

On the other hand, if you’re a budding content creator with no following, you likely don’t have hundreds of people engaging with your content. That’s okay.

While numbers and metrics have their own time and place, I’d say there is a huge advantage to nobody liking your content as an independent creative professional. 

Why?

It’s liberating to create for yourself and no-one else. 

One of the best feelings in the world is getting to work on your art without having to worry about what other people think.

More importantly, when you create work for yourself, suddenly the numbers matter less and less.

When what you seek isn’t metric success but self-expression, it’s a lot easier to make projects you like.

Don’t focus on metrics. 

Create and share things that you care about. 

The first chapter of my career will be about my parents

Loud, greasy, chaotic, overwhelming, stressful, tiring, and it’s over 20 years old. 

If you’re new here, let me introduce myself. 

My name is Anna and I work at our family restaurant business as my main job.

I’ll be honest, it’s not the most flashiest place to be but I wouldn’t trade it for anything else. 

Here’s why. 

  • 25 years into my life, I’m beginning to realize how much my parents had to work for their lives in Canada (15 hours shifts being the norm)
  • I’ve been at the family business ever since graduating college, and I’ve learned so much more at the restaurant than at school. 
  • This is a rare opportunity for me to get to know my own family, as my parents were always at work (and rarely at home) when I was growing up

Most of my own friends won’t understand these experiences, but I’ve accepted that. 

I’ve decided that I’m going to dedicate this small but critical part of my career to my parents. 

That means building the best business I can for them. 

It also means giving people like me pride for being raised by hardworking minority parents. 

Loud, greasy, chaotic, overwhelming, stressful, tiring, 20 year old thing—you and I’ve got work to do

 

You don’t need 1,000,000 followers to build a great business

The sweet number for you is likely less than a million. A lot less.

It might even be 200x less than 1,000,000—that’s 5,000 if you want to skip the math. 

You might just need 5,000 true followers to be happy. 

Or even 500.

Regardless, the number is a lot less than 1,000,000 so you can stop dreaming about how much greener the grass would be on the other side. 

Why do I say this?

I do social media for my family’s restaurant business, and we have a constant flow of new customers from Instagram and Tiktok coming in daily. 

Collectively we have around 11k followers, but to us that’s more than enough to keep our business thriving (that’s 90x less than 1,000,000). 

You can do the math for your business yourselves.

My point is, don’t think about the million. 

Instead, focus on the couple hundred you already have. 

You can still build a great business with a smaller following. 

My first lesson in marketing

It’s not about the ads. 

It’s not even about the company logo.

The first thing I learned about marketing is that you know you’ve done a good job when someone else feels a positive emotion when your name is brought up (comfort, relaxation, painless, reliable, strong, confident, trusted, passionate, and so on). 

Once you win over their hearts, everything else will come much easier.