An Hour A Day Keeps the Creative Itch at Bay

If I told you that you only need 1 hour of your day to fulfill these 3 things:

  • Scratch a creative itch
  • Practice a new skill
  • Build your personal brand

—do your ears perk up?

And if I told you that you’d also be:

  • Connecting with new people
  • Developing your self confidence
  • Getting over irrational creative fears

—would you want to hear more? 

The above is the premise for a content writing workshop I’m looking to build by the end of the year. I really want to build this workshop, however I’m not yet sure how many people would be interested in joining. 

To ensure that there’s a real audience for this, I’ve started a mailing list of people who want in. So far there are 8 of you and growing. 

If you want to be a part of the process and join me in making this content writing workshop happen, sign up for the journey here: https://us7.admin.mailchimp.com/reports/summary?id=0300683ce1f0

I’ll be sending emails about updates, and I’ll be sure to bug you about what you want out of it too. 

Yours truly,

Anna

Most people won’t do this when it comes to building their writing muscles. 

Repetition.

The act of writing, day after day after day after day.

For most people, writing is a fling. It’s a hobby. That’s fine.

But for those who want to commit and grow, we need repetition.

That’s why I want to kickstart a workshop full of budding writers who want to take writing more seriously. 

Writing can come in the form of copywriting, content writing, journalling, or storytelling. 

Whichever form, it doesn’t matter. 

What matters more is putting in the hours and the reps. 

If you’re interested in joining the would-be-writing-gym that lives online, I’d love for 2 things. 

  1. Email me what interests you about this idea (anna@habitfactory.space)
  2. Sign up for the newsletter about this workshop here

I’m only going to make the workshop happen when and if I get enough interest for it. 

Cheers,

Anna

Your social media metrics aren’t making the cut. So what?

In social media jobs, numbers matter. 

The higher your metrics go, the more successful your campaign or post was. 

On the other hand, if you’re a budding content creator with no following, you likely don’t have hundreds of people engaging with your content. That’s okay.

While numbers and metrics have their own time and place, I’d say there is a huge advantage to nobody liking your content as an independent creative professional. 

Why?

It’s liberating to create for yourself and no-one else. 

One of the best feelings in the world is getting to work on your art without having to worry about what other people think.

More importantly, when you create work for yourself, suddenly the numbers matter less and less.

When what you seek isn’t metric success but self-expression, it’s a lot easier to make projects you like.

Don’t focus on metrics. 

Create and share things that you care about. 

If you could invest $3 in your communication skills a day, would you do it?

I’m not talking about stocks or passive income streams. 

I’m talking about working on yourself and making a commitment.

If you could make a promise to yourself that would make you proud in a year’s time, would you do it?

I’m not talking about making a sudden huge commitment today, right now. 

I’m talking about small, tiny wins that snowball into something much bigger and impactful, overtime. 

The idea is as follows.

I’m thinking of starting a writing community. 

It won’t be free (but it might be $3 a day for x amount of days). 

The details are still being rolled out, but I’d love to hear if anyone wants to join me for the ride.

If you’re anything like me, you’re a sucker for learning alongside great people. 

That’s what The Habit Factory has always been about.

If you want to be a part of the process and hear about the writing workshop when it comes, I’d love for you to sign up for our newsletter here

I hope to see you there. 

“I want to start a blog” 

And you should. 

It’s free and if anyone could do it, it should be you. 

Having a blog means you have something worth sharing. 

It means you have ideas to bring to the table.

You offer a space for likeminded people to feel like they belong somewhere. 

More importantly, wanting to start a blog means you’ll be making your mark on the walls (yes, just like the cavemen and women). 

You should start a blog. Not to make money or build fame, but to create something for yourself. 

I’m in the process of creating a workshop for people who want to start keeping a blog. If you want to stay in the writing loop, sign up for updates here.

I hope to see you there as we build it.

The best way I like to cure a lack of inspiration when writing, is to allow myself to produce bad writing

That means being okay when you don’t like your own content.

It also means being okay when others don’t like your content either. 

We all go through dull, grey, uninspiring periods.

Don’t let that stop you from writing something new. 

I’ve written a blog post every day for 2 and a half years. Here’s how I never got creative block

Every day I do my thing.

I write.

Writing is something that I do because I enjoy it. 

That’s not to say I never get stuck on my words.

I get stuck every day of the year. 

Every day when I’m faced with a blank page, I have a moment of stuck.

What do I write about? 

How am I going to write it? 

Will it be interesting?

Whatever might hold value.

By scribbling it out and editing later (and only once).

It will only be interesting to only a few.

I see creative block as a psychological barrier to one’s own production.

Nothing’s actually stopping you, but yourself.

All your tools are there, it’s just you (really).

The goal of the block is to make you stop.

Meanwhile, you should make every effort to not listen to it. 

Don’t stop for the block.

How I turn bad writing into good writing

I’m on my 933rd consecutive blog post (I post daily). 

Though, I admit, I’m not the greatest blogger, but that’s not why I write.

Through the process of writing 933 blog posts, I’ve learned how to differentiate bad writing from the good. 

But first, what does bad writing entail? What makes bad writing bad and what makes good writing good?

Who decides? Who gets to make a decision on the subjective quality of a creative craft? Who makes the final call?

The answer is simple. 

Who are you writing for? These people are the ones who get to decide whether your piece is bad or good. 

Everyone else’s opinions don’t matter (including mom’s).

So before you go into a deep spiral about how terrible of a writer you are, just remember that the value of your writing is in the eye of the reader. 

So there you have it. 

So long as you provide something valuable for a specific reader, then you’ve got yourself a good piece of writing (at least it would be in my books). 

The Best Part About Nobody Liking Your Posts

In social media jobs, numbers matter. 

The higher your metrics go, the more successful your campaign or post was. 

On the other hand, if you’re a budding content creator with no following, you likely don’t have  hundreds of people engaging with your content. That’s okay.

While numbers and metrics have their own time and place, I’d say there is a huge advantage to nobody liking your content as an independent creative professional. 

Why?

It’s liberating to create for yourself and no-one else. 

One of the best feelings in the world is getting to work on your art without having to worry about what other people think.

More importantly, when you create work for yourself, suddenly the numbers matter less and less.

When what you seek isn’t metric success but self-expression, it’s a lot easier to make projects you like.

Don’t focus on metrics. 

Create and share things that you care about.